What’s Up With That Guy?

It’s been hard to miss Minnesota State Mankato alum Kris Lindahl with outstretched arms and a hard-charging grin adorned by the words “Guaranteed Offer.”

Though good-natured, his Twin Cities billboards blitz indeed prompted inevitable backlash, coming in especially hard on social media. The gripes are generally about the ads’ seeming omnipresence, truculence or lack of humility.

Lindahl tends to let the antipathy roll off his back. He credits being the oldest of his siblings for helping him develop a tough outer skin and to tune out the naysayers.

“I think our society has started to understand that some of these comments are not real-world,” said Lindahl, who earned a bachelor’s degree in education from Minnesota State Mankato in 2004. “It’s almost more like entertainment where people are saying things that they would never say to someone’s face.”

Kris Lindahl’s outstretched arms remain ever-present in the Twin Cities.

Lindahl is a single working father. He’s an older brother to siblings Jamie, Kory and Nick. He’s the leader of an agency of some 140 employees that revels in its family-like approach.

He came to Mankato for college, he says, because he had friends who were also attending—namely Nick Arellano, Matthew Brooks and Tony Lindgren. Fondest memories of his time spent at the University include taking a popular music class from Gerard Aloisio—”I still remember something he always said: ‘Music is a stimulus,’ says Lindahl—and playing intramural sports.

Lindahl’s intramural football team topped all Minnesota State Mankato competitors. The college then stepped up, sending his team to a national invitation tournament in Lincoln, Nebraska. “We still talk about it today,” he says.

Lindahl at a motivational work meeting with employees.

Lindahl credits experiences at the University for helping him develop a style of work ethic that has made him arguably the Twin Cities’ most recognizable realtor.

“The discipline aspect of showing up and making a commitment to getting a college degree,” he says, “never goes away.”